Tag Archives: wildlife control

Car Damaging Animals

Car Damaging Animals

Vehicle. Photo by Stephen M. Vantassel.

Vehicle. Photo by Stephen M. Vantassel.

Surprisingly, I have received a number of people asking me how to stop animals from chewing on the cables in their vehicles. The damage and inconvenience caused by these automotive loving animals ranges from nests, to chewing cables and tubes. Of course, people are always looking for magic solutions such as something they can spray or plug in to stop the animals from getting near their vehicles. The problem with chemicals and sprays lies with the heat generated by the vehicle. One wonders if a fire could result from the chemical being heated up; not to mention the smell, health threat and or potential damage to the vehicle. Don’t bother with ultrasound as there is simply no conclusive scientific evidence that they work to repel animals in real world situations.

So how can you respond to car damaging animals?

First, identify the culprit. Chances are the problem will be caused by mice, rats or squirrels, probably in that order. For additional help purchase, The Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook 3rd ed.

Second, reduce the rodent population through reducing food sources and population control. Removing and/or modifying bird feeders, reducing harborage and woodpiles will go a long way to reduce the problem. Now removing food and harborage is not an instant solution. But it is an integral part of the long term solution. Population control will be greatly enhanced when you reduce other food sources as it will make the baiting system more attractive. (Always check wildlife regulations in your area before instituting any animal damage control program). For population control, consider trapping.

Finally, try to garage your car and or park it in an area away from the tree line. In other words, park your car in the middle of the parking lot so that wildlife have to travel farther to reach your car. Are any of these suggestions magic? No. But they will reduce the problem. As always, I am open to other suggestions. Just e-mail me at wildlifecontrolconsultant@gmail.com

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a Certified Wildlife Control Operator (CWCP®) who helps individuals, businesses, and agencies resolve wildlife damage issues through training, writing, expert witness, and research. His latest books are the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd edition and The Practical Guide to the Control of Feral Cats. He can be contacted at wildlifecontrolconsultant at gmail dot com.

If you would like your publication, video, or product reviewed, please contact the author at the e-mail above.

Copyright

All postings are the property of Stephen M. Vantassel and Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC. Text (not images) may be reprinted in non-profit publications provided that the author and website URL is included. If images wish to be used, explicit and written permission must be obtained from Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC.

 

Canine Trapping Sets and Techniques–A Review

Pennsylvania Trappers Association, editors. 2008. Canine Trapping: Sets and Techniques by Top PA Trappers. PA Trappers Association. 120 pp.

Canine Trapping by PA Trappers

Canine Trapping by PA Trappers

The trapping of canines, be they coyotes, red fox or gray fox, is considered by most fur takers to be the ultimate expression of trapping expertise. Capturing an occasional canine is commendable and worthy of praise. But if you want to be a consistent canine trapper then you would do well to read the pages of this book.

Like their other book, Trapping Techniques, this volume is a collection of articles from various Pennsylvania trappers who have substantial experience catching canines. The first article, Trapping Ethics, sets the tone for the remaining articles. Essentially, Ed Price argues that trappers have a responsibility to treat the resource with respect and to not just follow the law but to think about how your actions will affect fellow trappers.

Later articles discuss fundamental skills for catching canines in general, such as set locations and dirt hole trapping. While much of the information is fairly standard, readers should be fascinated by the various and potentially conflicting opinions regarding specific techniques. For example, “Are canines spooked by large backings at a set or is it really much to do about nothing?” Another question is, “Does urine work by increasing territorial aggression or curiosity?” I’m sure you can find others. My point is that the book illustrates that trapping is as much art as it is science. Ultimately, you have to decide what works for you in your situation.

The book also contains articles reviews general principles for catching individual species (i.e. red fox, gray fox, and coyotes), while others delve into specific sets for footholds and cable-restraints. I was pleasantly surprised by the attention paid to trapping gray fox. Grays are one of the least understood canines as when compared to the red fox, very little academic research has centered on grays. Trappers in mixed habitats should find the information useful in adding gray fox to their lines.

Two articles by master bait makers, Russ Carmen and Bob Jameson, should help trappers make the most of their lure and urine use. Finally, the article on time management contains tips to shave minutes and possibly hours on your trapline each day. I am sure readers will find at least one tip to implement on their lines.

The book is 5 x8.5 inches in size, saddle-stitched and paperback. It is illustrated with line-drawings and black and white photos. Several articles could have benefited from additional illustrations. In addition, greater attention to editorial issues would have reduced the number of typos, layout changes, and improved clarity. Nevertheless, the information is invaluable and well worth the price. Whether you are a beginner to intermediate trapper, this book will help you improve the efficiency of your canine trapping. Regardless of your skill level, purchase of a book helps support your fellow Pennsylvania trappers.

Copies can be purchased for $12.00 plus shipping online at http://www. patrappers.com. Payment is made through PayPal. Both of their books are available for only $20.00 plus shipping.

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a certified wildlife control operator who helps individuals, businesses, and agencies resolve wildlife damage issues through training, writing, expert witness, and research. His latest books are the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd edition and The Practical Guide to the Control of Feral Cats. He can be contacted at wildlifecontrolconsultant at gmail dot com.

If you would like your publication, video, or product reviewed, please contact the author at the e-mail above.

Copyright

All postings are the property of Stephen M. Vantassel and Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC. Text (not images) may be reprinted in non-profit publications provided that the author and website URL is included. If images wish to be used, explicit and written permission must be obtained from Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC.

 

Responding to Competition-Part 3

Responding to Competition-Part 3

Collection of foothold traps (Photo by Stephen M. Vantassel).

Collection of traps often symbolize competition in the wildlife control industry. Photo by Stephen M. Vantassel.

A third area you need to consider is price. I don’t like talking about price because studies show that price is usually not the first issue people have with a service company. I want to warn our readers to avoid the siren’s call to lower prices. Now if you discover a better and more efficient way to do your business then by all means lower prices if competition forces you. The key is not to reduce your profit margin. The fact is anyone can lower prices. The danger to this industry lies in the hands of the low ballers. These are the guys who travel twenty miles for a squirrel and only charge 20 dollars. Even if you are loosing business to these guys try to fight the urge to simply lower your prices. Instead, try to add value to the price you already charge. You can add value by extending or establishing a warranty, have insurance, have workman’s comp insurance, that you are a Certified Wildlife Control Professional etc. Do and say things that show your potential clients that you don’t charge low prices because you don’t do low price quality work.  Show your clients that you are more expensive and like the Loreal commercial, you are worth every penny.

I cannot stress enough that price is not the key reason why most clients go with one service provider over another. (Most customers go with the first company that answers the phone but if that doesn’t do it, then customers decide on satisfaction). In my reading, a key reason why people choose one company over another is peace of mind. In other words, if the client hired you do they feel like they have made a safe choice? The scariest thing for a client is the feeling that they have hired a loser company. Unlike the experience in buying a product, a customer can’t return a service. You have to overcome the customer’s fear of hiring the wrong customer by giving them some level of security. If they can’t find it, they will then go to the lowest bidder to reduce their potential loss.

Finally, prepare for coming competition. As I said in the first paragraph, the industry is maturing. As much as you hate to admit it the easy money has been made. The rise in competition should force everyone to start treating their work as a business rather than a paid hobby. If you have an established business and the new guy on the block is beginning to take a bite out of your customer base, don’t panic. The business community is littered with the wreckage of fast growing companies that came in bragging how their business model would destroy the competition. The fact many new companies look great at the beginning. But the realities of heavy hours, dead beat clients, and bills quickly take their toll on these upstarts. The principle you have to keep in mind is to always run a lean operation that is ready to adapt and survive during the initial slow period caused by a new company.  For more often than not, that new company won’t be able to maintain their hectic pace for long. When and if they burn out, you will be to pick up the pieces and the profits.

There is certainly a lot more that can be said about preparing and responding to competition. However, I think you have seen enough to begin thinking about how you might handle that eventual occurrence or might respond to it if the competition is already upon you. Remember, if business was easy, everyone would be doing it.

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a certified wildlife control operator who helps individuals, businesses, and agencies resolve wildlife damage issues through training, writing, expert witness, and research. His latest books are the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd edition and The Practical Guide to the Control of Feral Cats. He can be contacted at wildlifecontrolconsultant at gmail dot com.

If you would like your publication, video, or product reviewed, please contact the author at the e-mail above.

Copyright

All postings are the property of Stephen M. Vantassel and Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC. Text (not images) may be reprinted in non-profit publications provided that the author and website URL is included. If images wish to be used, explicit and written permission must be obtained from Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC.

Responding to Competition-Part 1

Responding to Competition-Part 1

Stephen M. Vantassel speaking at the 2013 NWCOA/UNL Goose Academy in Indianapolis, IN. Photo by Vikki Rawe

Stephen M. Vantassel speaking at the 2013 NWCOA/UNL Goose Academy in Indianapolis, IN

Well, we have finally made it. The NWCO industry has finally started hitting a new plateau in its rapid growth. One of the best signs of this has been my receipt of calls regarding how to expand business. One call wanted to know how to handle the competition that has been crushing him. While painful for the caller, I see these sorts of questions as good news. It means that the industry is maturing. The result of this competition will be the improvement of customer service, pricing and techniques. The best days are ahead.

But if you learn that competition has been eating into your business I have a few ideas that may help you survive the assault. The first thing you must do when competition comes is watch your attitude. Sure you may hate your competitor as scum and think that he doesn’t do the job like you. But the fact remains that getting angry does nothing. Instead of seeing your competitor as an enemy, begin to look at him as your personal business trainer. Your competitor will help you make sure you aren’t getting lazy or sloppy in your work. Failure to look at your competition in a positive light will only poison your own business. As they say, attitude is everything. Make sure yours is a positive one.

More details in the next blog.

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a certified wildlife control operator who helps individuals, businesses, and agencies resolve wildlife damage issues through training, writing, expert witness, and research. His latest books are the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd edition and The Practical Guide to the Control of Feral Cats. He can be contacted at wildlifecontrolconsultant at gmail dot com.

If you would like your publication, video, or product reviewed, please contact the author at the e-mail above.

Copyright

All postings are the property of Stephen M. Vantassel and Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC. Text (not images) may be reprinted in non-profit publications provided that the author and website URL is included. If images wish to be used, explicit and written permission must be obtained from Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC.

 

 

 

The Burden of Trapping

The Burden of Trapping

Cage-trapped Raccoon. Photo by Stephen M. Vantassel.

Cage-trapped Raccoon. Photo by Stephen M. Vantassel.

Unlike traditional pest control that relies on toxicants to kill unwanted animals, cage, box, and other forms of live trapping require wildlife control operators (WCOs) to euthanize or translocate the animals in accordance to state and local laws. Typically, WCOs remove captured animals from the client’s property and place them in the back of the truck and deal with the animal back at the office.

Unfortunately, sometimes a WCO may “forget” about the animal in the back of truck. This is a rare occurrence. And usually if it does happen, the WCO rectifies it the next morning. But sometimes, something disastrous occurs, such as what happened to Christy Clark, a WCO in Rhode Island.  According to the news story published by The Westerly Sun on June 28, 2013, http://www.thewesterlysun.com/news/pest-control-franchisee-charged-with-cruelty-to-animals/article_31b79c3c-dffc-11e2-92e2-0019bb2963f4.html Ms. Clark had a cage-trapped raccoon in the back of her truck that was not attended to for 6 days because she had left on a trip and forgot about it. A neighbor, hearing the animal’s scratching etc., notified authorities. Upon their arrival, they found the raccoon dead from thirst/heat. Ms. Clark was charged with animal cruelty.

Distractions Can Cost You

My point is not to wag a finger at Ms. Clark, whom I am confident feels terrible about this situation. Rather I want to emphasize to WCOs the importance of staying focused on the tasks at hand by instituting procedures that help you avoid tragic mistakes like this. Owning and running a business is extremely taxing not only on your body but also on your attention. Customer calls, being tired, thinking about the rest of the day or how much paperwork you have to do or an employee that got a customer angry, etc. can prevent you from following procedure. Break procedure and bad things happen, whether it is forgetting to tie down a ladder, stopping for a red light, or forgetting to remove a raccoon from the back of the truck.

Bottom Line

Learn from this tragic event. Recognize that but for the grace of God go you. And lastly, institu

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a certified wildlife control operator who helps individuals, businesses, and agencies resolve wildlife damage issues through training, writing, expert witness, and research. His latest books are the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd edition and The Practical Guide to the Control of Feral Cats. He can be contacted at wildlifecontrolconsultant at gmail dot com.

If you would like your publication, video, or product reviewed, please contact the author at the e-mail above.

Copyright

All postings are the property of Stephen M. Vantassel and Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC. Text (not images) may be reprinted in non-profit publications provided that the author and website URL is included. If images wish to be used, explicit and written permission must be obtained from Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC.

te a system to help prevent this from happening to you.

 

A Walk Down Memory Lane

A Walk Down Memory Lane

With my years at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, some people forget that I used to

Stephen M. Vantassel when he owned Wildlife Removal Service, Inc. in Springfield, MA.

Stephen M. Vantassel when he owned Wildlife Removal Service, Inc. in Springfield, MA. in 1998.

perform wildlife control services for a living. I attach an image here as “proof” that I used to work for a living. :)

This cover photo of Wildlife Control Technology magazine (March/April 1998) was of me when I owned Wildlife Removal Service, Inc. I ran the company in Springfield, Massachusetts full time for nearly five years before selling it.

This particular issue of Wildlife Control Technology magazine contained an article I wrote entitled “Buying a New Truck.”

Vantassel, Stephen. (1998). Buying a New Truck. Wildlife Control Technology, 5, Cover, 38-39.

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a certified wildlife control operator who helps individuals, businesses, and agencies resolve wildlife damage issues through training, writing, expert witness, and research. His latest books are the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd edition and The Practical Guide to the Control of Feral Cats. He can be contacted at wildlifecontrolconsultant at gmail dot com.

If you would like your publication, video, or product reviewed, please contact the author at the e-mail above.

Copyright

All postings are the property of Stephen M. Vantassel and Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC. Text (not images) may be reprinted in non-profit publications provided that the author and website URL is included. If images wish to be used, explicit and written permission must be obtained from Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC.

Fur Trapping and Difficult Landowners

Stephen M. Vantassel baiting a Collarum.

Fur Trapping and Difficult Landowners

I am on the state’s list as a trapper who is willing to help landowners with wildlife problems. Essentially, we trap during the season for landowners who are having a problem. I recently received a call from a landowner having a problem with a particular species.

I asked him to describe the problem. His description was rather imprecise so I asked some follow-up questions regarding what the problem was. My philosophy is I don’t want to get involved in something that won’t work or may be too difficult (unless I am looking to learn from it).

He needed the problem resolved quickly. I said, I wanted to wait a few weeks for the fur to get more prime. I also wanted to trap other species at the same time. He remarked he didn’t want me there for a long time. I said, I had no intention to be there for a long time. I said mileage expenses were  $0.555/mile so I was not going to dally around. He already knew that the animal he wanted controlled was only worth around 20 dollars so was aware I wasn’t getting rich and would probably lose money on an absolute basis.

He then seemed to get frustrated and said he would call someone else.

Bottom Line

My point is simply this. Landowners, unless you are paying for trapping services, don’t be cheap. Understand that fur trapping is time intensive and that trappers can trap other species at the same time they are resolving the original problem. That is the beauty of trapping as a force multiplier. Fur trappers are not getting rich despite what you might think.

Fur trappers don’t devalue your services. I suspect that this unnamed landowner may have been someone who didn’t like trapping and only wanted trapping to occur to solve his problem. I could be wrong. But don’t be so desperate to trap that you make your important services a commodity. Remember, no one respects what they get for free.

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a certified wildlife control operator who helps individuals, businesses, and agencies resolve wildlife damage issues through training, writing, expert witness, and research. His latest book is the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd edition. He can be contacted at wildlifecontrolconsultant at gmail dot com.

If you would like your publication, video, or product reviewed, please contact the author at the e-mail above.

Copyright

All postings are the property of Stephen M. Vantassel and Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC. Text (not images) may be reprinted in non-profit publications provided that the author and website URL is included. If images wish to be used, explicit and written permission must be obtained from Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC.

Are Foothold Traps More Indiscriminate than Cage Traps?

Are Foothold Traps Indiscriminate?

 

English: Leghold trap. Français : Piège à mâch...

This size trap is what the animal rights protest industry wants you to think is what the majority of trappers are using. Image via Wikipedia

 

One of the charges that Animal Rights Protest Industry Activists lay against trappers and wildlife control operators (WCOs) is that footholds are indiscriminate. Typically this charge is coupled with “cruel” but for this post I only want to discuss the indiscriminate charge.

 

The accusation usually goes like this. This trap (fill in the blank) needs to be banned because it can’t distinguish between target (the desired animal in need of control) and the non-target animal (the animal that is not sought to be controlled). The idea is to make traps appear to be these lurking threats in the landscape that are waiting to harm everything.

 

Here are the facts about foothold trapping

 

1. If your definition of indiscriminate requires a standard of 100% accuracy then, the animal rights protest claim is correct. Traps are indiscriminate if the standard is perfection.  But notice, this standard also rules out cage and box traps (often mistakenly called “live traps). Furthermore, even hunting is not 100% selective as noted by the fact that humans, livestock, and non-game animals also get shot.

 

2. For those willing to have a more reasonable standard, then footholds can be decidedly selective. Here’s how.

 

a. Location. Trappers select sites where the desired animals are likely to go. For instance, placing a trap in water (particularly cold water of November through February) make is very unlikely to catch non-targets.

 

b. Bait. Certain lures and baits are more likely to attract some animals over others.

 

c. Trap type. Certain traps are designed to capture certain animals while avoiding others, e.g. Collarum, Lil’ Grizz, etc. While these traps are not typically called, footholds, animal rights protest activists hate them too as demonstrated by their proffering Question 1 in Massachusetts (which ultimately was passed by an ignorant and misinformed voting public) in 1996.

d. Trap size. Small traps are less likely to catch large animals.

 

e. Pan Tension. The pan is the disk in the middle of the foothold that triggers the trap when depressed. By increasing pan tension, trappers make it harder for lighter animals to fire the trap.

So the bottom line, just as guns don’t kill people, people kill people, traps are only as good or bad as the person who uses them. Unfortunately, in our soundbite society, it is easier for people to demonize a tool rather than to understand the complexities of reality.

 

About the Author

Stephen M. Vantassel is a certified wildlife control professional who has a great interest in the way the animal rights protest industry distorts the facts about wildlife management and consumptive sports. His dissertation on the animal rights movement was published in a book entitled, Dominion over Wildlife? An Environmental-Theology of Human-Wildlife Relations (Wipf and Stock, 2009). He has written many articles on the animal rights protest industry and actively seeks opportunities to debate them to set the record straight.

 

 

 

 

 

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Streamlight 44200 Vulcan Flashlight

Streamlight 44200 Vulcan Flashlight : A Review

Vulcan Flashlight by Streamlight

Vulcan Flashlight by Streamlight. Photo by Stephen M. Vantassel

 

Ever since my spotlight of choice was no longer being manufactured, I’ve been on a quest to find a spotlight capable of replacing it. I use the term spotlight, rather than flashlight, because a spotlight is a light designed to throw a concentrated beam of light over a great distance. Flashlights are less powerful and designed more for close up work and/or area illumination.

Review of the Flashlight

I recently had the opportunity to review or try out the Vulcan® Flashlight manufactured by Streamlight. The light comes with a number of nice features. The manufacturer says it provides up to 80,000 candela (peak beam intensity) with its halogen bulb. The battery can last over 3 hours per charge.

It is heavy duty uses a lead-based battery which means that you don’t have to train the battery to recharge it. It has superb handle grip and quality lens cover and two different settings for shining light. The toggle switch is long enough and positioned to allow it to be moved even with a gloved hand.

After charging the flashlight up (which took about four hours) I was able to try it out. The light is pretty focused but I didn’t notice a significant difference in the illumination between the low and the high settings. On the day with some overcast, I tested the flashlight on my house to see how well it would illuminate during a daylight inspection. I spotlighted the attic vent of my ranch house which is about 20 feet above me. The light illuminated quite well, as I was able to evaluate whether the mosquito netting was intact. I then shined the light at my roofline to see what kind of range I would have with the light. I was able to see the light at the peak my roof which would 30 to 40 feet away from where I was standing. While I could see the light, I don’t believe it would have been strong enough to allow me to assess the integrity of the gable of a second-floor house.

The package comes with two chargers, home outlet and a cigarette lighter adapter for charging in a vehicle. The shoulder strap enable hands-free carrying, which would be useful when climbing a ladder or entering an attic. I believe the flashlight is worth $105.00 particularly for anyone who would be looking for a good balance between battery life and illumination. The price comes from WildlifeControlSuppllies.com which made the device available to me for review.

About the author

Stephen M Vantassel is a certified wildlife control operator and is available for consultation, seminars, and research projects related to wildlife damage issues. You can reach him at StephenVantassel(at)Hotmail(dot)com. He has received no compensation for this review.

Choosing a Career in Wildlife Control

Choosing a Career in Wildlife Damage Control

I had been asked for information on this career by a Vocational Career Counselor. WCC hopes to help career counselors to understand more about this occupation.

Defining Terms

  • Trappers are normally fur trappers. Trappers are people who seek animals for their fur. This occupation is usually a hobby or a part time business except for a few individuals.
  • Animal damage controllers, wildlife control operators, nuisance wildlife control operators, wildlife controllers by contrast are people paid by customers to remove  problem animals. While there is overlap between these two jobs, (as people can do both and often do) they are in many respects different. Animal damagecontrollers work year round. Fur trappers work in the fall and winter.
  • Pest Control is a different industry. Pest control deals primarily with bugs, mice and rats and often use pesticides. Animal damage controllers, by contrast, rarely use pesticides and handle wildlife such as squirrels, skunks, raccoons, moles, voles, beaver, etc.

 Key Facts about Animal Damage Control

Most animal damage controllers are self-employed. They tend to be a very independent bunch and don’t like working for others. However, some of the larger companies do hire workers. While not many have reached this size, the industry is maturing and so the opportunities for employment are growing.

Normally, these companies are contracted by the customer for a specific problem, ie. squirrels in attic. The relationship ends when the problem is resolved. Sort of like the way people hire a plumber to fix a leak. You pay for the service and the plumbler leaves when the problem is resolved.

Legal Issues for Wildlife Controllers

Most states require a license. These licenses will be issued through the state’s division of fisheries and wildlife or similar sounding agency. Wildlife control is a controversial issue. Potential workers need to understand that humane issues are a prime concern. Failure to follow standard procedures can result in severe legal and publicity problems. The field is still lacking many regulations so entry into the field is relatively easy.

Occupational Requirements

  • Physically demanding. Success in this field will require walking, climbing ladders, scaling roofs, crawling under buildings and into attics. If you cannot lift 80 pounds or more comfortably, you would not be able to work with ladders. Animals can weigh anywhere from 2 pounds for a gray squirrel to 20 pounds with a raccoon to 50 pounds for a beaver. While the weight doesn’t appear to be that high, remember, you will need to carry the trap away from your body which causes the weight to feel heavier due to reduced leverage.
    Carrying caged animals off roofs adds to the danger as the animal will run back and forth in the cage thereby shifting the weight of the cage. Failure to prepare for the change can cause a catastrophic fall off the ladder.
  • Dangerous: Job exposes the worker to dangers from animals, heights and crawl spaces. Exposure to zoonotic diseases is a real risk.
  • Methodical: Workers need to perform similar tasks with consistent accuracy and thoroughness.
    Responsible: Workers will need to remember where traps have been set. In some cases, dozens of traps located around a city will need to be remembered and checked daily no matter what the weather.
  • Driver’s license: Worker will need to be able to operate a light to heavy truck safely while under time pressure.
  • Customer Relations: Workers will be required to have high customer service skills. Work is often done inside homes with customers watching. Phone skills is a definite must.
  • Ability to work without supervision. Work is often lonely and without supervision of a boss or client.

 Opportunities for Training

National Wildlife Control Training Program

National Wildlife Control Program

National Wildlife Control Training Program. I am the primary author for this training published by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Cornell University.

I have published the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, rev. ed. The third edition is expected by March, 2011.

Wildlife Control Technology Magazine. This is the trade magazine of the industry.
Nuisance Wildlife Control Operators Assoc. This is the trade association of the industry.
If you have any further questions, please don’t hesistate to ask.

 

About Stephen M. Vantassel, CWCP

Stephen is a Certified Wildlife Control Operator who is nationally known for his writing on wildlife damage management topics. He can be reached at stephenvantassel(at)hotmailDOTcom