Helping resolve human-wildlife conflicts

A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a boy

Posted by on Apr 4, 2010

I recently reviewed this book by attorney Wesley J. Smith on Amazon.com. Whether you are support or oppose animal rights, Smith’s discussion of the social and ethical issues involved in the debate are necessary reading. His statements will, at minimum, refine one’s position. You can read my review at  http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/AO75WOAGEXMAK/ref=cm_cr_dp_auth_rev?ie=UTF8&sort_by=MostRecentReviewStephen M. Vantassel, CWCP Stephen M. Vantassel is an expert in wildlife damage management and nationally known writer on wildlife damage control and animal rights issues. His latest book is Dominion over Wildlife? An Environmental-Theology of Human-Wildlife Relations (Wipf and Stock 2009). Share...

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Acton Institute

Posted by on Nov 6, 2010

Christians, The Care of Creation, and Global Climate Change is yet another work dedicated to exhorting Evangelical Christians to take environmental issues seriously and more particularly, to support efforts to reduce behaviors contributing to global climate change.   The book is a compilation of a series articles separated into two sections. The first section contains articles from a panel discussion on global climate change that occurred at Wheaton College (Chicago) in 2007. The articles confront the difficulty in proving that humans are in fact responsible for climate change and that greenhouse gasses (Carbon dioxide in particular) are responsible for such change. Ultimately, the authors suggest that the evidence, though short of proof, is so overwhelming that one must be ideologically motivated to deny the evidence and the resultant conclusion, namely humans need to act now to reduce carbon emissions in order to forestall a global environmental catastrophe. Since it is written for Christians by Christians, frequent appeals to helping one’s “poorer” neighbor and caring for God’s creation are repeated in evangelistic fashion. Articles in the second section cover the transition at Wheaton...

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Advertising

Posted by on Sep 27, 2012

Business Trucks: Signage or No Signage? I wanted to focus attention on one of the most important aspects of a NWCO’s business, his truck. Other than your own health, your truck is your business. You take it everywhere. Your truck is a part of you and your company.  Your truck also tells customers something about the kind of business you run. Don’t make excuses. The fact is your customers will judge you by your truck and the condition they see it in. Question is, should your truck be covered is signage or not? Unfortunately, the debate over this question is not an easy one to solve. Let’s talk about the arguments in favor of truck signage first. Argument #1. Low Cost The strongest argument for signage is the low cost. Labeling your truck turns your vehicle into a moving billboard. Now instead of spending money on gas and repairs, you can know that some of this money is at least drawing new customers. We all know that marketing is one the most significant problems facing NWCO’s. The fact is people don’t...

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bait

Posted by on Oct 10, 2013

A Bait Holder for Liquid and Chunk Baits Every wildlife control operator (WCO) knows that suspending bait is preferable to throwing it on the cage floor. The problem is how does one suspend slurry or liquidy baits? A while back, I discovered the answer while accompanying Dennis Ferraro of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln during some turtle trapping. I noticed a large white PVC pipe inside his turtle traps. I asked him what it was. He said it was his bait holder. The device, he said, was perfect because it allowed him to put in fish chunks needed to lure turtles to his traps. The Ferraro bait holder uses a 4-inch long piece of 2-inch PVC pipe, 1 threaded end piece with threaded cap, and 1 solid end cap. He then would drill ¼-inch holes around the perimeter of the 4-inch piece. Ferraro then inserted a ¼ inch threaded eye-screw through the screw-on cap which could be attached to a chain clip for easy hanging in the turtle trap. With the bait holder suspended with the solid end-cap down, any liquid in...

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Recent Posts

PVC Pipe Toxic Bait Stations

Using bait stations to apply toxic baits for rodents is a good way to reduce the risks to non-target animals. Bait stations also protect the bait from undue exposure to damaging weather. But if you are in an area where use of PVC pipe toxic bait stations is appropriate, then be sure to add a small barrier at the end of each of the pipes to prevent loose-grain bait from flowing out of the ends. Failure to have these end pieces will likely result in some of the loose grain bait being spilled and therefore available to non-targets. Just be sure that the hole that remains is large enough to allow the target animals in. Stephen M. Vantassel is a Certified Wildlife Control Operator. He has published several books, including, The Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd ed. Share...

Homemade Bait Dispenser 

Toxic bait dispenser for applying baits for ground dwelling animals don’t seem to be professionally manufactured. Fortunately, you can build your own homemade bait dispenser with some simple tools and materials. The following homemade bait dispenser is made of 1/4-inch rod (about 30 inches), a washer, split rivet, and an end section of 1-inch copper pipe.  Bend the rod to form a handle on one end, then flatten the other end and drill a hole through it to take the split rivet. Drill a hole through a section of pipe and use the washer on the inside of the pipe. Measure the volume of the pipe section with water against a standard measurement (be it teaspoon or tablespoon, depending on the toxicant you plan on using.  Grind or cut the pipe to match the needed volume. It’s a great way to dispense bait around burrows of ground dwelling animals. Just be sure to ONLY use the device for toxicants. Stephen M. Vantassel helps property owners resolve conflicts with vertebrate animals. He has written several books, including The Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook, 3rd ed. Share...

Homemade Bait Dispenser

You can build your own toxic bait dispenser with the following materials. 1/4- metal rod. About 24 inches in length Washer Split rivet 1-inch wide end section of copper pipe Cut it the end pipe to appropriate measurement size. Drill a hole through it  heat and bend the metal rod to crest a handle  flatten other end  droll a hole through the rod  connect the pipe, washer and rod with the split rivet. Check the capacity of the pipe again to ensure it is still the right measurement. Enjoy using the dispenser. Share...

Bat Management Standards

Bat Management Standards Regrettably, too many states lack suitable regulation or licensing requirements for wildlife control operators (WCO). The result of this abdication of governmental oversight is a kind of wild west of activities and techniques used by individuals in the business of performing vertebrate pest control. Certainly, regulations and licensing doesn’t guarantee quality workmanship on the part of professionals, the pest control industry demonstrates that, but we do know that regulation would certainly help stem the tide of sloppy WCO work. The White-nose Syndrome Conservation and Recovery Working Group (4/1/2015) has published Acceptable Management Practices for Bat Control Activities in Structures – A Guide for Nuisance Wildlife Control Operators. This stimulus for this guide was driven by the staggering losses to bat populations caused by the fungal infection known as White-nose Syndrome. With such losses, it is critical that WCO activity avoid killing bats unnecessarily as well as spreading the disease. Wildlife Control Consultant,LLC. commends the working group for working with the National Wildlife Control Operators Association (NWCOA) to develop these bat management standards. WCC, LLC hopes that states will adopt these guidelines as their own. Note that Wildlife Control Consultant, LLC is a member of NWCOA. Stephen M. Vantassel specializes in vertebrate pest control. Share...

Birds and Dumpsters

Birds and Dumpsters One of the cardinal principles in wildlife damage management can be stated as, remove the food and you remove the animal. Too often however, people don’t take the few extra seconds to clean up spilled food, secure gates, or close dumpster lids. You may be familiar with raccoons and dumpsters, but you should be familiar with the combination “birds and dumpsters”.  Note the several magpies that are looking for food in this particular dumpster whose users failed to close the right lid.  Don’t let this be you. Feeding unwanted wildlife will eventually lead to problems later on. Stephen M. Vantassel specializes in helping people resolve conflicts with vertebrate animals.   Share...